Cheers to that!

You should all know by now that I’m the queen of fun cocktails. Whether they be classics reinvented or something I’ve whipped up out of boredom, I’m always one to experiment with my liquor. Given that my roommate is part Peruvian part Chilean, you should’ve expected this recipe to come sooner or later..
For those of you who have never had the chance to experience Pisco Sours, I highly suggest you do. ASAP. All the ingredients should be found at your local liquor/grocery store, you will just have to dig a bit.

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Some history on the drink for you courtesy of our friends at wiki:

The cocktail originated in Lima, Peru, and was invented by Victor Vaughn Morris, an American bartender, in the early 1920s. Morris left the United States in 1903 to work in Cerro de Pasco, a city in central Peru. In 1916, he opened Morris’ Bar in Lima, and his saloon quickly became a popular spot for the Peruvian upper class and English-speaking foreigners. The Pisco Sour underwent several changes until Mario Bruiget, a Peruvian bartender working at Morris’ Bar, created the modern Peruvian recipe of the cocktail in the latter part of the 1920s by adding Angostura bitters and egg whites to the mix.
In Chile, historian Oreste Plath attributed the invention of the drink to Elliot Stubb, an English steward of a ship named Sunshine, who allegedly mixed Key lime juice, syrup, and ice cubes to create the cocktail in a bar, in 1872, in the port city of Iquique, which at that time was part of Peru. The original source cited by Plath attributed the invention of the whiskey sour to Stubb, not the Pisco Sour. The oldest known mentions of the Pisco Sour are from a 1921 magazine attributing Morris as the inventor and a 1924 advertisement for Morris’ Bar published in a newspaper from the port of ValparaĂ­so, Chile.
Chile and Peru both claim the Pisco Sour as their national drink, and each asserts exclusive ownership of both pisco and the cocktail. Peru celebrates a yearly public holiday in honor of the cocktail during the first Saturday of February. The two kinds of pisco and the two variations in the style of preparing the Pisco Sour are distinct in both production and taste. Thus the Pisco Sour has become a significant and oft-debated topic of Latin American popular culture.

And most importantly, the recipe…

In a blender, mix:
1 egg white
3/4 c sugar
1 c pisco liquor
7-8 large ice cubes

Once blended, add in 1/2 c freshly squeezed lime juice, and blend once more.
(note: the traditional way is to use key limes, however regular ones work just as fine)

Pour in to glasses and add a sprinkle of cinnamon on top.

each batch makes about 5 servings.

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They look good, right?
If you’ve never had them before don’t let the raw egg white freak you out! You don’t taste it, I promise 🙂

Enjoy!

xo SA

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Secondary causes for screaming

The USA has been given a lot of flack in recent days for the rising costs of childbirth, with ranges from $10-20,000 pending on natural delivery or C-section, and every minor procedure or test being itemized on the final bill. I think Zimbabwe takes the (birthday) cake for the most ludicrous itemization of childbirth–screaming. It’s a pretty well-known fact around the world that screaming..kindof just happens in this situation. In some countries in fact the mom-to-be actually gets a bigger gift from her husband post-delivery the louder she does so! With the average income in Zimbabwe being $150/year, the $5 per scream rule is a bit over the top. Do the hospital admins really value the peace and quiet that much, or do you think they’re just looking to see the money?
While the US may be criticized for its pricey delivery fees, this income-to-potential-cost ratio has to be one of the worst I’ve seen. Especially if you’ve get a set of lungs.
Read about the rest here

For the record, the rule only applies to moms. Newborns are allowed to scream as much as they wish given that you know, they’re babies and all.

What do you think of this proposal? Is this a good policy or just a way to make money? Should other countries adopt this rule?

xo SA

Scatter My Ashes at Bergdorf’s

So I recently found out that a premiere of Scatter My Ashes at Bergdorf’s is making its way to my own city, and I can not be more excited. I am a documentary junkie to begin with, but on the fashion industry? How can I not run to get tickets?! (And of course drag a gaggle of my friends, who are equally as excited, with me).

The event website describes the film as such:

It’s the most mythic of all American emporiums – and the scene of many an ultimate fashion fantasy. Now audiences get a rarified chance to peek behind the backroom doors and into the reality of the fascinating inner workings and fabulous untold stories from Bergdorf Goodman’s iconic history in Matthew Miele’s Scatter My Ashes at Bergdorf’s. The legend, the parties, the fashion idols, the windows, the women, the buyers and shoppers — and most of all, the quintessentially American dreams of New York’s high-fashion hot-spot – all come to life in an ode to a realm where creativity and commerce reign equally supreme. With a light touch, Miele explores not just the glamour but the passion behind the daily creation of this luxury mecca in a film as dynamic, lush and intimate as the store itself.

And of course the trailer…

Are you planning on seeing the movie when it comes out? Are you overly excited and interested in getting a premiere in your home town as well?

xo SA